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Pest Hotline
Statewide: 643-PEST
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Report your pest in person.

Report a known pest or a plant or animal that you suspect may be acting invasively.

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The Hawaii Early Detection Network is an invasive species reporting system designed to assist in the early detection and rapid assessment of new and incipient invasive species in Hawaii, as well as a tool to provide for interagency communication of invasive species reports. This project seeks to engage the public in the early detection of new alien pest and provide them with a system to report their findings.

Hawaii is in the midst of an alien species invasion that threatens the islandsí environment, economy, and quality of life. Non-native plants such as miconia, grow out of control producing millions of seeds per tree every year, threatening to take over natural areas and watersheds. Non-native animals such as the little fire ant jeopardize tourist revenue, residentsí property values, and local agriculture. Containing and removing these unwanted visitors costs Hawaii taxpayers millions of dollars a year.

With the increase of traffic to and from the islands, this influx is not likely to stop. In fact, 20 to 50 new non-native species arrive every single year. Early detection of and rapid response to new invasive threats entering the islands will reduce the overall impact of these species before they become out of control. An effective reporting system is needed to connect early detectorís sightings to those agencies tasked with removing new invasive pests.

If you are interested in participating in this project as an Eyes and Ears volunteer, or simply for more information, please contact reportapest-maui@lists.hawaii.edu.

Last Updated: Tuesday September 16 2014. If you have any questions about the Hawaii Early Detection Network contact reportapest-maui@lists.hawaii.edu.
Funding and support for this project was made possible by the Hawai'i Invasive Species Council, the USDA Forest Service State and Private Forestry assistance, and University of Hawai'i-Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit.